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Natural Fibres

Today the industry extract fibers from sources beyond the noble natural animal and vegetal origins. We call them Man-Made fibres. These fibres are regenerated plants, minerals, coal or oil produced in laboratory with chemicals. We divide all textile fibres textile into following categories - depending on which raw materials and refining process used:

• Natural Fibres:
A) Animal fibres are hairs, furs, feathers and secrets from mammals, avians, insects and bivalves. They are all noble (non-generated) fibres - except Aralac from Milk is regenerated with laboratory procedures and chemicals.
B) Vegetable fibres are "hair" from plants; such as seeds, bast/bark, leaves and fruits - categorized both 1) Noble and 2) Non-noble;
1) Noble: Seed fibres as Cotton, kapok - Processed Bast fibres; Flax, jute, kenaf, hemp and ramie - or Hard fibres from Leaves and Fruits.
2) Non-noble: Regenerated, artificial fibres made of cellulose extracted from plants* with laboratory procedures and chemicals: Viscose; Rayon and Acetate, Modal, Tencel (Lycocell) among.
*Plants: Gras, wood, bark and leaves from bamboo, eucalyptus, cottonwaste among.

• Synthetic Fibres: Chemical fibres of synthesized polymers or small molecules made from petroleum based raw materials such as coal and oil, produced with laboratory procedures and chemicals. Nylon, polyester, acrylic, polyefin, spandex, modacrylic, kevlar, modex among.

The world market for noble fibres (both animal and vegetable) has dropped dramatically in the last decades because of the synthetic fiber replacements in this capitalized textile industry. Recent years even more because of the periods of economic recession. In addition to this the escalation of the chemicals used are huge, because of no regulations and knowledge of the outcome. While naturally occurring fibers grow with their natural functions, takes natural colour pigments easily and easily dissolves in nature - the synthetic fibers needs synthetic artificials, toxics, pesticides, pigments and dyes - and does not dissolves in nature. So is this a ticking bomb?

We divide all textile fibres textile into following categories - depending on which raw materials and refining process used:

  • Natural Fibres:

A) Animal fibres are hairs, furs, feathers and secrets from mammals, avians, insects and bivalves. They are all noble (non-generated) fibres - except Aralac from Milk is regenerated with laboratory procedures and chemicals.

B) Vegetable fibres are "hair" from plants; such as seeds, bast/bark, leaves and fruits - categorized both 1) Noble and 2) Non-noble;

1) Noble: Seed fibres as Cotton, kapok - Processed Bast fibres; Flax, jute, kenaf, hemp and ramie - or Hard fibres from Leaves and Fruits.

2) Non-noble: Regenerated, artificial fibres made of cellulose extracted from plants* with laboratory procedures and chemicals: Viscose; Rayon and Acetate, Modal, Tencel (Lycocell) among.

*Plants: Gras, wood, bark and leaves from bamboo, eucalyptus, cottonwaste among.

  • Synthetic Fibres: Chemical fibres of synthesized polymers or small molecules made from petroleum based raw materials such as coal and oil, produced with laboratory procedures and chemicals. Nylon, polyester, acrylic, polyefin, spandex, modacrylic, kevlar, modex among.

Animal fibres

These fibres generally contain proteins such as collagen, keratin and fibroin:
• Animal hair: Noble fibres collected from mammals such as muskox (qiviut), yak, deer, horse, camel, vicuna, alpaca, lama, sheep and lambs (wool, merinowool), goats (mohair, cashmere), dogs, rabbits (angora), etc.
• Avian Fibre: Feathers and down-fibres from birds.
• Silk fibre: Fibres secreted by glands of insects during the preparation of cocoons.
• Bivalves: Keratin fibres from the Pinna nobilis (when attaching itself into rocks using a strong byssus composed of many silk-like threads.) The animal secretes by this byssus gland are even 6 cm (2.4 in) long and can be spun into sea silk.

Their evolution of natural functions in changing temperatures, varying climates and habitats have given each of the animal fibres unique strengths and specialities. Some of the common qualities are:

• In pure form; 100% made by nature, no pesticides, chemicals or artificials.
• Incredible warm and high insulating property - even in wet conditions
• Fast absorption of moisture - up to 1/3 of their own weight without any feeling of dampness.
• Health-bringing abilities - maintaining a balanced body temperature in varying temperatures.
• Natural Micro fibre anatomy - with high resistance against filth and bacteria.
• Self-cleaning ability - concentrated proteins neutralise contaminants and bad odour.
• Easily cleaned in low temperatures - low energy required.
• No plastic footprint from the washing machines. (No "leak" of dangerous micro-plastics into the wastewater - as s